Contact
trump healthcare

How Trump’s Healthcare Bill Impacts Women’s Health Costs

Could Trump’s Healthcare bill inflate the price of pregnancy by over 400%?

The Republican bill to repeal and replace Obamacare just narrowly passed the House last month. Americans—women especially—are now scrambling to understand what this change means for their health care coverage… and their wallet.

The new bill would completely overhaul the government’s role in helping Americans obtain affordable and comprehensive healthcare. Reforms made in the bill would cut funding for pre-existing conditions, Medicaid, women’s health organizations like Planned Parenthood, and much more.

And unfortunately for women who are pregnant or without coverage but may become pregnant during the healthcare transition, the future may be more uncertain. In fact, the future might be pretty darn expensive. The new bill would increase the cost of pregnancy drastically. A 425% increase, to be exact, according to an article by Huffington Post.

So what does this mean for women’s health costs?

Women may be reading this and scratching their heads asking, how could this happen? Well, the answer is simple, albeit extremely irritating; your current pregnancy would now be considered a pre-existing condition… like cancer or diabetes.

Pre-Existing Conditions

Stopping insurance companies from denying coverage for pre-existing conditions was one of the major policy changes enacted under Obamacare (the ACA) which constituents from both parties strongly endorsed. Under this new AHCA bill, pregnancy is now considered a preexisting condition, which means you could be denied coverage or only given options with unmanageable premiums if you try to get health insurance once you’re already pregnant. It’s estimated that under this bill, a pregnant woman could be charged as much as $17,000 annually for coverage. That is nearly the cost of 4 years of college tuition for your unborn child.

Prenatal Care

Another way pregnancy could become more expensive for women under the AHCA bill is pregnancy-related care, which would no longer be covered. Obama’s Affordable Care Act required that coverage for prenatal, pregnancy and infant care be designated as an essential health benefit. The ACHA would allow states to remove this requirement at their own discretion, which many will undoubtedly do.

Maternity Coverage

Today, all health plans include coverage for maternity care for women. The new bill would completely gut those coverages and turn back the clock to when women could be charged a 25-percent markup for C-sections.

Who Does This Affect?

Let’s be honest here, you may be thinking this bill only affects pregnant women without insurance coverage… but most of us don’t have a crystal ball. We can’t know definitively when pregnancy will happen – it’s been known to happen without planning! You or someone you know could easily find themselves in the category of “pregnant without coverage”, by losing a job or transitioning to a spouse’s insurance plan at the wrong time.  

That’s why it is so important for women of all ages, incomes, and walks of life to be aware of their options when it comes to health care coverage. If you take the time to educate yourself, you’ll be able to make financial decisions that are best for you when it comes to medical expenses. If you’re facing an uphill battle against hospital medical bills from your pregnancy, or some other scenario, Parasail can help. Learn more about our 0% Interest ProPatient payment plans and see if you qualify… And in the meantime, consider calling or emailing your Senator and voicing your concern – before they vote to pass this bill into law – if this is an issue that you believe is important. These changes are daunting, but the good news is, women still have a voice.

To learn more about this bill and how it can affect all kinds of patients, check out this article:http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/donald-trump-health-american-healthcare-act-pregnancy-insurance-obamacare-trumpcare-a7717216.html

To contact your senator, go here: https://www.senate.gov/senators/contact/